Hubble Discovers a Hungry Black Hole That Shapes a Captured Star Like a Donut

Hubble Discovers a Hungry Black Hole That Shapes a Captured Star Like a Donut – Black holes don’t hunt; they congregate. They wait patiently till an unfortunate star passes by.

Hubble Discovers a Hungry Black Hole That Shapes a Captured Star Like a Donut
Hubble Discovers a Hungry Black Hole That Shapes a Captured Star Like a Donut

Once close enough, the star is severely torn apart by the black hole’s gravitational pull and its gases are sloppily devoured while being belched forth in a powerful radiation field.

The last moments of a star before it is swallowed by a black hole have been meticulously captured by astronomers using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope.

“Tidal disruption events” describe these. However, the language obscures the intricate, unrestrained violence of a black hole encounter. The gravitational attraction of the black hole on material from stars is balanced by the radiation’s ejection of material.

Black holes are messy eaters, to put it another way. Hubble is being used by astronomers to learn more about the specifics of what transpires when a wandering star enters the gravitational black hole.

Black Hole Twists Star Into Donut Shape Video

Since the devoured star is located roughly 300 million light-years away at the galaxy’s centre, ESO 583-G004, Hubble is unable to capture the mayhem of the AT2022dsb tidal event up close. But to investigate the light from the fragmented star, which contains hydrogen, carbon, and more, astronomers employed Hubble’s powerful ultraviolet sensitivity. Forensic information on the black hole homicide is provided via spectroscopy.

Astronomers have identified about 100 tidal disruption events near black holes using a variety of equipment. On March 1, 2021, another black hole tidal disruption event was observed by many of NASA’s high-energy space observatories, and it occurred in a different galaxy. Data was gathered in X-ray radiation, as opposed to Hubble observations, from an incredibly hot corona surrounding the black hole that emerged after the star had already been shattered.

However, considering the observing duration, there are still very few tidal occurrences that are seen in ultraviolet light. This is extremely unfortunate because ultraviolet spectra can provide a wealth of information, according to Emily Engelthaler of the Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian (CfA).

“We’re happy that we can learn more about what the debris is doing. We can learn a lot about a black hole from the tidal event. The dying star is undergoing changes on a time scale of days or months.

The last moments of a star before it is swallowed by a black hole have been meticulously captured by astronomers using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope. Credits: Paul Morris, Lead Producer at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

The stellar shredding is thought to occur just a few times every 100,000 years for any given galaxy with a quiescent supermassive black hole at its centre.

The All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN or “Assassin”), a network of ground-based observatories, first discovered an AT2022dsb stellar eating event on March 1, 2022. This survey looks for violent, variable, and transient events that are reshaping our cosmos.

The Hubble astronomers were able to conduct ultraviolet spectroscopy over a longer time than usual since this violent collision was close enough to Earth and brilliant enough.

These events are typically challenging to observe. Perhaps a few observations are made when the disturbance first starts, when it is quite bright. Our software is unique in that it is created to examine a few tidal events over the course of a year to determine what occurs, according to Peter Maksym of the CfA.

We detected this early enough to witness it during these really active periods of black hole accretion. The pace of accretion decreased over time, eventually becoming a trickle.

According to the interpretation of the Hubble spectroscopic data, the former star is now a highly bright, hot, donut-shaped region of gas. A black hole is located in the centre of this region, which is the size of the solar system and is known as a torus.

“We’re searching a location near that donut’s edge. We are witnessing a star wind being projected towards us from the black hole at a speed of 20 million miles per hour, or 3% the speed of light, Maksym said. “We’re still trying to process the event, in all honesty. As a result of the star being destroyed, this material is entering the black hole.

As a result, there are models that make you believe you understand what is happening, and then there is what you actually observe. Being at the nexus of the familiar and unfamiliar is an interesting place for scientists to be.

The findings were presented during the American Astronomical Society’s 241st meeting in Seattle, Washington.

NASA and ESA collaborated internationally on the Hubble Space Telescope project. The telescope is run by NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Hubble and Webb science operations are carried out by the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), which is located in Baltimore, Maryland. The Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, based in Washington, D.C., runs STScI for NASA.

More About Hubble Discovers a Hungry Black Hole That Shapes a Captured Star Like a Donut Update Soon….

Also ReadNASA Discovered New Earth Like Planet

Leave a Comment